Sri Lanka accidents

 

 

Humanitarian demining only really got started in Sri Lanka in 2000. Complexities with the National authorities and UNDP has made gathering records difficult at times, and the fighting has prevented independent investigations and oversight. As a result the accident record is far from complete. In the records available, the medical details are sparse and there is little medical follow-up.

These reports are NOT numbered in a progressive date sequence.

Accidents in Sri Lanka may be especially interesting because most of the accidents occurred when using rakes - and the injuries are often slight. There is one accident with another excavation tool and one with a metal-detector. Both resulted in more severe injury.

Most mines discovered in Sri Lanka are small. See the P4 and Type 72 AP. This may go some way to explaining why the injuries using rakes are so slight, but they have inflicted severe injuries when excavating with other tools.

 

DDAS Incident number

DDASaccident410.pdf

DDASaccident411.pdf

DDASaccident412.pdf

DDASaccident413.pdf

DDASaccident414.pdf

DDASaccident415.pdf

DDASaccident416pdf DDASaccident417.pdf DDASaccident418.pdf

DDASaccident424.pdf

DDASaccident427.pdf

DDASaccident438.pdf

DDASaccident439.pdf

DDASaccident440.pdf

DDASaccident441.pdf

DDASaccident442.pdf

DDASaccident464.pdf

DDASaccident536.pdf

DDASaccident537.pdf

DDASaccident538.pdf

DDASaccident539.pdf

DDASaccident540.pdf

DDASaccident541.pdf

DDASaccident564.pdf

DDASaccident707.pdf

DDASaccident747.pdf

DDASaccident772.pdf

DDASaccident779.pdf

 

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